Cool Names, Creative Thinking and Humor

In a recent post Seth Godin wrote: “Getting smart about naming is at the heart of marketing.” But how do you come up with a cool name for your product or service?

Mike Brown answers that question in a great post on the Brainzooming Blog: Creating Cool Product Names for a New Product Idea – 8 Creative Thinking Questions. What’s enjoyable about this post is the invitation to apply our creativity to the naming process. Too often naming is either left to “the experts” or done by means of some black-box process that attempts to appear analytical and scientific.

Mike’s eighth question is: “What words would be more exciting, powerful, fun, surprising, or memorable?” I’m not sure what Mike means by “powerful,” but below is an example of a product name that’s exciting, fun, surprising and memorable.

Cat-on-Egg

Chat-en-Oeuf is a word play on the French wine Châteauneuf-du-Pape. Calling a wine Chat-en-Oeuf (Cat-on-Egg) is cool because it’s:

  • Surprising. It sort of sounds like Châteauneuf but it has nothing to do with a “new castle”, the meaning of Châteauneuf. And what’s a cat doing sitting on an egg?
  • Fun. Somebody is doing word play here and has a great sense of humor. They’re breaking away from the snobbery that often surrounds anything to do with wines, especially French wine.
  • Exciting. “Chat,” “en,” “oeuf” are close to the sum total of the French I remember from my one and only year of study–and I got the joke!
  • Memorable. The name’s surprise and fun prompted me to buy the wine. And it was exciting and definitely worth buying again.

The graphic on the label nicely compliments the name. Together the words and image have a very powerful effect. Cool naming. Brilliant branding.

Brilliance Activator helps leaders uncork the creative power of their teams to develop products and services that delight customers, increase repeat sales, and improve their profit margins. Receive regular insights and information from Brilliance Activator by subscribing to our free newsletter.
This entry was posted in Brilliance, Communication, Creative Thinking Techniques, Thinking Skills and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Get Adobe Flash player